SESOC

Journals Abstracts

These are short abstracts of the material printed in our journal which is published twice annually. The Journal covers items of interest to structural engineers, including but not limited to: technical papers, project reports, materials information, code reviews.

Journal: Vol 17 No. 2 2004

 

Title
Editorial_The Changing Of The Guard Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Esli Forrest
Abstract

The time has come for me to lay down the editorship of the SESOC Journal. I took this work on 9 years ago after my retirement from consultant practice. It has been both interesting and stimulating and I would encourage other engineers facing retirement to consider continuing involvement in the profession which could be beneficial both to the profession and themselves
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Title
Letters To The Editor Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Carl O’Grady
Abstract

I was impressed by the guest editorial, by Richard Fenwick and the integrity he exhibited in stepping outside the academic cocoon, to examine the current rationale among engineering academics. The current scenario he describes is one where practical design experience is disdained in favour of the writing of esoteric papers for export, based on a priori conjecture. Surely, if, as he describes, researchers are virginal as to practical site experience or even practical design experience, they live in a world of the abstraction, without the anchor of reality.
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Title
Hardened Properties Of New Zealand Self-Compacting Concretes Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

J. R. Mackechnie, B. Kesha
Abstract

Self-compacting concrete has a reduced coarse aggregate function and increased fjnes to produce a viscous, flowable material, which does not segregate. The material is dominated by the high paste content but must perform like normal structural concrete in the hardened state. Five commercial self-compacting concretes containing either fly ash, slag, microsilica, limestone powder or viscosity modifying agents were tested in the laboratory and compared to normal structural concretes. Findings from this research indicate that strength properties are enhanced when using self-compacting concretes but dimensional stability may be compromised, leading to slightly higher drying shrinkage, thermal expansion and cracking potential and lower elastic modulus.
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Title
Wind Tunnel Study Of Crosswind Force Spectra For Low Aspect Ratio Buildings Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Nick Locke, Peter Cenek, Clark Hyland
Abstract

The structural form of buildings in New Zealand is generally driven by earthquake life-safety design considerations. These encourage the development of light-weight, flexible, ductile structures with low natural frequencies. Such structures are less affected by damaging high frequency ground motions and develop structural damage in a predictable and reliable way. However, as designs become more structurally advanced and building forms more varied, design calculations using the Australia / New Zealand Wind Loading Standard 1'" have shown that some medium-rise buildings, even as low as 10-storeys high, may become wind sensitive under in-service weather conditions with a return period of 1 to 5 years. This may lead to wind motion discomfort for some occupants on upper floors of such buildings. While not wanting to compromise the important earthquake life-safety characteristics of building structures, a greater appreciation of the ways to analyse and design for satisfactory occupant comfort during low return period winds is now needed for a greater range of multi-storey buildings in New Zealand.
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Title
Bond Strength Of Reinforced Concrete-Beam Column Joints Incorporating 500 Mpa Reinforcement Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Nicholas Brooke, Les Megget, Richard Fenwick, Jason Ingham
Abstract

A database of beam-column joint test results has been assembled and analysed to determine appropriate design drift limits for the prevention of bond failure in reinforced concrete frames. In order to enhance the coverage of the database which predominantly contains units having small beam reinforcing bar sizes, further beam-column joints have been designed at the University of Auckland using 25 mm beam reinforcement. Results from the first two of these tests are reported. Despite the first unit not meeting the requirement,! of the recent amendment to NZS 3101:1995 with respect to column depth, the units did not exhibit a bond failure in the joint region.
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Title
Charts For Singly Reinforced Rectangular R.C. Beam In Flexure Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Doug Mackenzie
Abstract

While it is recognized that many structural engineers have computer programs that calculate the required area of reinforcing for a given bending moment, these charts are supplied to provide a quick means of doing so independently of computers.
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Title
Articles for Discussion_Updating the Soils Programme Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Esli Forrest
Abstract

The SESOC Soils Program has proved very popular and has over 400 users, however, the program was originally written to help members in the use of document BINM4 of the Building Code and in its conception and architecture was limited to this. As development proceeded over a period of four years many requests were received to extend its use to cover a much greater range of design elements than was ever intended in the original architecture. The result was a program that was not as user friendly as we would desire.
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Title
Project Corner Design And Construction Of The New Upper Harbour Crossing Vol 17 No2 2004
Author/s

Andrew Dickson, Ian Billings, Mark Evans
Abstract

This paper was prepared for the Austroads 5th Bridge Conference held in Hobart in May 2004. It is reproduced here with the addition of current photographs with the kind permission of Austroads and Transit New Zealand. The New Upper Harbour Bridge consists of a 458 m long balanced cantilever bridge together with approach spans and is under construction alongside the existing crossing of the Waitemata Harbour in Auckland. The new bridge is being implemented under a Design and Construct contract. The design employs a wide transversely post tensioned single cell box girder, elimination of joints and bearings (except at abutments), use of approach span deck units for temporary access staging, two stage pours for cantilever segments and the use of external and internal longitudinal post tensioning in the box girder. It meets or exceeds all project aesthetic, environmental, durability and operational requirements and was proved via the tender process to be particularly cost-effective.
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