SESOC

Journals Abstracts

These are short abstracts of the material printed in our journal which is published twice annually. The Journal covers items of interest to structural engineers, including but not limited to: technical papers, project reports, materials information, code reviews.

Journal: Vol 20 No. 2 2007

 

Title
Categorisation of Post Disaster Facilities Vol 20 No 2 2007
Author/s

Working Group Convened By David Brunsdon and supported by the Department of Building and Housing - A Guidance Note for use with AS/NZS 1170: Part 0 Table 3.2.
Abstract

The Department of Building and Housing, in conjunction with the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, has commenced a project initiative to link structural design requirements for post-disaster facilities with overarching civil defence emergency management requirements. It is intended that this work will prompt Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Groups and Territorial Authorities to identify special facilities and set policies to help improve their post-disaster functionality. Lifeline utility organisations, government departments and local authorities have the additional requirement under section 60 of the Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEW Act that they must ensure they are able to function to the fullest extent possible, even though this may be at a reduced level, during and after an emergency. There is a need for informative text which provides a linkage between this requirement and Table 3.2 in AUNZS 1170.0.. Clarification of the categorisation of these facilities in A W S 1170 raises wider issues in relation to the designation of those which are critical after a disaster. Such designation should be made at a higher level than a standard for the structural design of buildings to give a wider effect. There is recognition within the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, Ministry of Health, the Department of Building and Housing and other agencies that action should be taken. As a means of informing the decision process, the Department of Building and Housing intends to prepare a position paper summarising the issues that need to be addressed and the reasons. This will require the involvement of all agencies directly affected by the categorisation. Through this wider involvement it is hoped to raise awareness and promote consistency in the designation of the importance of various facilities that reflect the wider community perspectives.
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Title
Ability of NZ Houses to resist Wind and Earthquake Racking Loads Vol 20 No 2 2007
Author/s

Stuart J Thurston
Abstract

This paper summarises recent work done at BRANZ to ensure good house performance under wind and earthquake loads. Problems were identified and recommendations made for changes to the New Zealand timber framed buildings standard, NZS 3604:1999. The work comprises: Inelastic time history computer analysis of models of houses to investigate torsion in houses with horizontal irregularity. Testing walls with window openings to determine maximum opening size and location which would not prejudice the wall bracing strength. Changes of nailing pattern around the edges of windows which would simplify construction but not prejudice wall bracing strength were also investigated. Determination of the maximum racking load a bracing wall can resist which is compatible with minimum floor construction stipulated by NZS 3604.
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Title
Empirical Equations for Predicting the Fundamental Period of Eccentrically Braced Steel Buildings Vol 20 No 2 2007
Author/s

Huantian Xiao, Clark Hyland (Based on a paper presented at the Pacific Structural Steel Conference 2007)
Abstract

The Commentary of the Earthquake Loadings Standard NZS: II 70.5provides an empirical method for predicting the fundamental period of vibration of steel frames. The method does not use material and section properties appropriate to the limit state under consideration. Therefore the predicted period can be very different from the value obtained from more accurate analysis. The inaccuracy normally leads to significant overestimating the design actions in the preliminary design stage. Steel Construction New Zealand has been involved with preliminary steel structural design of more than 190 steel structures in New Zealand since 1995. This paper presents an improved empirical method to estimate the fundamental period of steel framed structures according to the height and mass distribution based on the Steel Construction New Zealand, SCNZ design database.
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Title
Fibre Reinforcement – Steel vs Synthetic Vol 20 No 2 2007
Author/s

Alan Ross
Abstract

This paper looks at the two main fibre types used to reinforce concrete in slabs on grade and shotcrete (ground support). It discusses their relative performance in the different laboratory tests used to evaluate fibre reinforced concrete composites and proceeds to argue what these differences in behaviour in the laboratory will mean in real structures. It does this by particularly addressing the advantages to be gained by reinforcing slabs on grade with fibres that are tuned to improving the load carrying capacity of a product as brittle as concrete.
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Title
Structural Engineering Competence in the Computer Era Vol 20 No 1 2007
Author/s

Iain MacLeod (Previous& published in IStructE's The Structural Engineer Vol 85 No. 3)
Abstract

Since the introduction of computers to support design and analysis, concern has often been expressed that the use of software tends to result in a decline in basic structural engineering skills. The modern use of computer programs to carry out design processes introduces an element of risk. The risk must be assessed and managed. The use of computers has many benefits but demands a higher level of intellectual effort and competence than in the past. The paper explains why this is so and discusses how process control strategies can help to ensure that computer-aided design not only provides an acceptable level of risk but can also have potential to increase competence.
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Title
The Use of a Semi-rigid Flange Bolted Joint at Auckland International Airport – Terminal Expansion Vol 20 No 1 2007
Author/s

A S Beer
Abstract

A semi-rigid Flange Bolted Joint system was adopted in the current expansion of the Auckland International Terminal Building. The newly developed joint offers a number of advantages, and the various design issues identified on the project were overcome. Important modifications to the design procedures are recommended for “gravity dominated” frames. Improvements to the joint were introduced and tested that significantly increase the inelastic rotation capacity.
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