SESOC

Journals Abstracts

These are short abstracts of the material printed in our journal which is published twice annually. The Journal covers items of interest to structural engineers, including but not limited to: technical papers, project reports, materials information, code reviews.

Journal: Vol 19 No. 1 2006

 

Title
Quenched and Tempered Reinforcing Steel Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

John Hare
Abstract

In general, the fact remains that care must be taken to avoid any activity that may reduce the strength of the outer layer of steel that is strengthened through the quenching and self-tempering process. So welding, hot bending, re-bending or threading must also definitely be avoided.
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Title
ASI Eccentrically Loaded Cleat Compression Design Model 1996 In Need of Revision Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

Charles Clifton
Abstract

As a result of analyses recently undertaken by HERA, it is apparent that the calculated “blue book” (Design of Structural Steel Hollow Connections, by Syam and Chapman) capacity with respect to eccentrically loaded cleats in compression: 1. Is significantly unconservative, with the extent of unconservatism depending on the connection geometry. 2. The peak axial load that can be carried is reached at relatively low axial deformation, after which side sway occurs, (refer Figure), resulting in the axial load capacity dropping significantly. 3. The peak axial load is particularly sensitive to erection tolerances and fit-up.
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Title
The Concrete Design Standard 2006 Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

Dene Cook
Abstract

The Concrete Design Standard has been reviewed and rewritten and is now available for purchase. The Standard has been significantly modified and in this article we provide an overview of the changes.
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Title
Composite Metal-Deck Slabs Subject To Concentrated Loading Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

Alistair Fussell, Kevin Cowie And Xiao Huantian
Abstract

Composite metal-deck slabs consist of a profiled steel decking and an in situ concrete topping. The decking serves the dual function of permanent formwork to the wet concrete and, when the concrete has gained sufficient strength, external reinforcement to the slab to resist applied loads. Design aids for these floor systems have consisted of manufacturer prepared Design Manuals and recently computer based design software. This information has typically addressed uniformly distributed loading, with little guidance available to local designers for metal-deck slabs subject to concentrated loading. In lieu of appropriate local design standards reference is often made to the British limit state format Standard BS 5950.4 [1] when designing for such loading. Rather than reproducing this Code verbatim, the intention of this paper is to focus on the modifications required to standard New Zealand reinforced concrete design practice to account for the unique features of composite metal-deck slabs in resisting concentrated loads.
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Title
Shear Design Of Concrete Masonry Structures Using NZS 4230:2004 Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

K.C. Voon and J.M. Ingham
Abstract

The shear provisions in the recently updated masonry design standard, NZS 4230_2004, were significantly revised to incorporate a model that accounts for the reduction in masonry shear strength when flexural ductility level increases. This model allows consideration of the beneficial influences on masonry shear strength of the dowel action of tension longitudinal reinforcement and of wall aspect ratio. The revised masonry shear provisions also treat the strength enhancement provided by axial compression as an independent component of shear strength, resulting from a diagonal compression strut. Design illustrations are presented to demonstrate the intended procedure when using these new shear provisions.
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Title
Inclined Screws For More Efficient Timber Joints_Observations At University Of Karlsruhe Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

John Chapman
Abstract

Concerned with timber joints for industrial and commercial structures. In these joints, the coachscrews are organised so that they work in tension and not in the usual way of shear and bending. The researchers have found that a considerably less number of fixings is needed. These types of coach-screw joints can be used for transferring axial load, shear, and bending moments. However, for simplicity, I shall begin by explaining how a joint with axial load works.
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Title
Design And Testing Of A Composite Timber And Concrete Floor System (Reprinted Structural Engineer Volume 84 No.4) Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

Richard Persaud, Dr. Digby Symons
Abstract

Timber frame buildings may have low embodied energy, but have the disadvantage of low thermal mass. Steel and concrete composite construction provides good thermal mass but is becoming less economic with the increasing cost of steel. This paper presents results from testing of a composite system that allows the use of timber with improved structural efficiency and increased thermal mass. The composite system consists of a concrete slab cast on profiled steel decking acting compositely with glue-laminated timber beams. Composite action is achieved with coach screw shear connectors between the beams and slab. The connectors have been tested in “push-out” shear tests and a three-point bend test of a full-scale floor slab has been completed. The composite system is more than three times as stiff and almost twice as strong as the same beam/slab configuration without composite action. Existing analytical and design methods are compared to finite element predictions and the experimental results and show good correlation.
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Title
Project Corner Arch Bridge Strengthening_Tainui Bridge over Waikato River NZ (Based on paper presented at IPENZ Bridge Design Conference, October 2005)Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

P. T. Sheasby, I. D. Sloane
Abstract

The 327 m long Tainui Bridge over the Waikato River in New Zealand was identified as a bridge to be strengthened on the proposed route on which to haul super loads of up to 520t as part of the Huntly Power Station upgrade project. This 45 year old structure requires substantial strengthening in order to carry these loads which are some six times heavier than those for which the bridge was originally designed. Strengthening works to the sub and superstructure required unique design solutions that took into account incorporation of existing components of the bridge, where possible, to reduce costs. While the substructure and deck components are retained and strengthened where necessary, the existing arch units will be replaced while the structure remains open to traffic. The strengthened structure will have a more aesthetic appeal, be more robust and durable giving it an extended life, aspects that will benefit all users. The project team developed an innovative solution for erection of the new arch components.
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Title
Piers 1½, 3 And 5 Strengthening and Restoration, San Francisco Vol.19 No.1 2006
Author/s

Zander Sivyer, John Hare, Trevor Kelly
Abstract

The San Francisco Waterfront is characterised by its historic Pier structures, dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Concurrent with the successful restoration of the Ferry building and the adjacent Pier 1 (now the home of the Port of San Francisco offices), the Port of San Francisco solicited proposals for the redevelopment of the adjacent Piers 1½, 3 and 5. Holmes Consulting Group, through its San Francisco subsidiary Holmes Culley, became involved with the successful bidder, Pacific Waterfront Partners (PWP). As part of the rehabilitation, a seismic retrofit of the existing concrete Wharf and Pier substructure to meet the requirements of the San Francisco Building Code (SFBC) was required. The existing substructure was severely degraded due to prolonged exposure to the aggressive marine environment of the San Francisco Bay. A significant amount of work was required to rehabilitate the gravity load resisting system of the substructure to meet the required design loading. From our initial analysis it was obvious that the existing substructure, even when strengthened to support the required gravity loading, did not have the lateral load capacity to meet the requirements of the SFBC.
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